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B1563 Fan, table type, powered by hot air engine, metal / asbestos, designed by Alfred Draeger, made by Draeger-Ventilator, Lubeck, Germany, 1913-1930. Click to enlarge.

Draeger-Ventilator fan powered by a hot air engine

Made 1913-1930

While a hot air cooling fan seems to be a paradoxical object, fans run by small hot air engines were made throughout the twentieth century and proved useful in areas not served by electricity. This fan was designed and made in Germany and was probably used in Sydney.

The design of the fan is both functional and decorative. A hidden reservoir in the base holds liquid fuel, which burns during operation of the fan; the piston and displacer are housed in the stem; and the crankshaft is housed in a ...

Summary

Object No.

B1563

Object Statement

Fan, table type, powered by hot air engine, metal / asbestos, designed by Alfred Draeger, made by Draeger-Ventilator, Lubeck, Germany, 1913-1930

Physical Description

Fan, table type, powered by hot air engine, metal / asbestos, designed by Alfred Draeger, made by Draeger-Ventilator, Lubeck, Germany, 1913-1930.

The fan incorporates a Stirling cycle engine in its stem and a spirit burner in its base. Air heated by the burner rises, moving the loosely-fitting displacer piston upwards and allowing the air to be cooled via the decorative ventilation holes in the side of the stem and the fins at the top of the stem. The air and displacer piston then fall to repeat the cycle. The movement of the displacer piston causes the tightly-fitting power piston to move, and this movement turns the crankshaft, which sits horizontally in the spherical cowling above the stem, and hence turns the four fan blades.

Marks

On a plate on the column: 'Draeger-Ventilator gestzlich geschutgt' [which means 'legally protected'].

Production

Notes

Alfred Draeger patented the Hot Air Ventilating Fan in 1913. The date of manufacture of this fan is not known.

The firm Draeger-Ventilation was founded in 1889 by Johann Heinrich Draeger as Draeger & Gerling in Lubeck, Germany. In 1891 Draeger was granted a patent for the Lubeca valve which was used in gas pressure regulation in brewing. Over the years the firm expanded its area of expertise in the general area of gas pressure regulation, especially oxygen pressure regulation in ventilation and respiratory apparatus and anaesthetic equipment. In 1947 the company manufactured an 'iron lung'. In 2003 it entered into a joint venture, called Draeger Medical, with Siemens.

Made

1913-1930

History

Notes

The history of the fan is unknown.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Mr F Tipping, 1964

Acquisition Date

24 April 1964

Cite this Object

Harvard

Draeger-Ventilator fan powered by a hot air engine 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 23 July 2019, <https://ma.as/208086>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/208086 |title=Draeger-Ventilator fan powered by a hot air engine |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=23 July 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

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