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B1495-2 Radio receiver, Catalina flying boat, 'Frigate Bird II', metal / Bakelite, made by Western Electric, New York, New York, United States of America, 1940-1951, used on pioneering flight Australia-Chile, by P G Taylor, 1951. Click to enlarge.

Radio receiver from Frigate Bird II

Made
A radio receiver consisting of a rectangular metal box containing electrical wiring. A control panel with dials can be seen on one end of the box and a metal a cylinder is attached to the opposite end.

Summary

Object No.

B1495-2

Object Statement

Radio receiver, Catalina flying boat, 'Frigate Bird II', metal / Bakelite, made by Western Electric, New York, New York, United States of America, 1940-1951, used on pioneering flight Australia-Chile, by P G Taylor, 1951

Physical Description

A radio receiver consisting of a rectangular metal box containing electrical wiring. A control panel with dials can be seen on one end of the box and a metal a cylinder is attached to the opposite end.

Marks

Metal label reads 'SIGNAL CORPS U.S. ARMY / RADIO RECEIVER BC-455-B / SERIAL NO. 88824 / MADE BY / WESTERN ELECTRIC / NEW YORK, N.Y.'
Inscribed on one side 'SC / 1296 / A'
Metal label to rear cylinder 'Westinghouse / DYNA MOTOR / STYLE #957972 / CONTINUOUS DUTY. RATING / DC INPUT / VOLTS 28 / AMPS 1.1 / D.C. OUTPUT / VOLTS 250 / AMPS 0.05 / MANUFACTURED BY / WESTERN ELECTRIC KS-5572 L1. / MADE IN U.S.A'.

Dimensions

Height

140 mm

Width

120 mm

Depth

310 mm

Production

Notes

The radio receiver was made between approximately 1940 and 1951 by the Western Electric Company in, New York, United States of America.

Cite this Object

Harvard

Radio receiver from Frigate Bird II 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 24 July 2021, <https://ma.as/207902>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/207902 |title=Radio receiver from Frigate Bird II |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=24 July 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}