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'The Sir Ross Smith Aeroplane Race Game' board game

Made
The 1919 air race from England to Australia won by Australians, Ross and Keith Smith, is illustrated in this children's board game of the time. The Smith brothers flew in a twin-engine Vickers Vimy heavy bomber, repaired enroute with chewing gum and pieces of fruit crates. The aircraft had the registration G-EAOU, which Smith's crew jokingly referred to as 'God 'Elp All Of Us'. The race was meant to demonstrate the feasibility of long-distance air travel, and prize money of £10,000 was offered …

Summary

Object No.

A8184

Object Statement

Board game, 'The Sir Ross Smith Aeroplane Race Game', cardboard / paper, maker unknown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1919

Physical Description

Game, 'The Sir Ross Smith Aeroplane Race Game, for two or more players' commemorating a record flight between London and Australia, 1919, printed in Sydney

Dimensions

Height

5 mm

Width

60 mm

Depth

60 mm

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Mr & Mrs E A & V I Crome, 1982

Acquisition Date

24 March 1982

Cite this Object

Harvard

'The Sir Ross Smith Aeroplane Race Game' board game 2022, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 25 June 2022, <https://ma.as/196074>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/196074 |title='The Sir Ross Smith Aeroplane Race Game' board game |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=25 June 2022 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.