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10007-5 Tubular saw for cutting button blanks from pearl shell, part of a didactic display, metal, maker unknown, Sydney, Australia, 1875-1885. Click to enlarge.

A tubular saw attachment use in the manufacture of pearl shell buttons.

Made
  • 1875-1885
A metal tubular revolving saw attachment that is used to remove the button blanks from the pearl shell. The saw has a small, circular, serrated cutting edge, part of which has broken off. The circular serrated edge is attached to a tubular section fixed to a square block and screw.The saw revolves at a high speed cutting out button blanks. The saw's diameter determines the diameter of the button blank.

Summary

Object No.

10007-5

Object Statement

Tubular saw for cutting button blanks from pearl shell, part of a didactic display, metal, maker unknown, Sydney, Australia, 1875-1885

Physical Description

A metal tubular revolving saw attachment that is used to remove the button blanks from the pearl shell. The saw has a small, circular, serrated cutting edge, part of which has broken off. The circular serrated edge is attached to a tubular section fixed to a square block and screw.The saw revolves at a high speed cutting out button blanks. The saw's diameter determines the diameter of the button blank.

Dimensions

Height

32 mm

Production

Made

  • 1875-1885

History

Notes

Part of didactic display used to illustrate the manufacture of pearl buttons from Australian pearl shell, as occurred in Sydney between 1875 and1885.

Cite this Object

Harvard

A tubular saw attachment use in the manufacture of pearl shell buttons. 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 1 July 2022, <https://ma.as/19>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/19 |title=A tubular saw attachment use in the manufacture of pearl shell buttons. |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=1 July 2022 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}