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A5 Goblet, blown glass, made by Venice & Murano Glass and Mosaic Co/Compagnia di Venezia e Murano, Venice, Italy/London, England, c. 1888. Click to enlarge.

Murano glass goblet

Made
This goblet is a fine example of the pagliesco (amber coloured) blown glass made by Venice & Murano Glass and Mosaic Co in Murano and retailed by Compagnia di Venezia e Murano (both formerly Salviati & Co) in London, England.


The company employed the best glass blowers, designers and technicians available in order to create the intricate designs.This goblet was acquired in 1889 from the recently expanded London branch popularly known as Compagnia di Venezia e Murano. The initial success of …

Summary

Object No.

A5

Object Statement

Goblet, blown glass, made by Venice & Murano Glass and Mosaic Co/Compagnia di Venezia e Murano, Venice, Italy/London, England, c. 1888

Physical Description

A goblet made from clear amber-tinted glass. The goblet has a fluted bowl with two C-shaped twisted handles on either side, and a long stem with five ribbed knobs.

Dimensions

Height

200 mm

Width

120 mm

Production

Notes

This goblet was made by Venice & Murano Glass and Mosaic Co (formerly Salviati and Co). in Murano, Venice, Italy c. 1888, and retailed by Compagnia di Venezia e Murano, London, England, 1889.

History

Notes

The Museum was established in 1880 as a result of the Sydney International Exhibition, then under the name The Technological, Industrial and Sanitary Museum of New South Wales. The Museum's early collection included a wide range of glass and ceramics, made by some of the leading glass and ceramics manufacturers in the world, as well as examples of woodwork and metalwork. In addition, the Museum collected examples of industry, technology and science, including steam engines and early flying machines.

The goblet was one of the very first purchases of decorative by the Museum, acquired to inspire local creative industries. Following a handful of other items, it was at the top of the first museum system devised specifically for Applied Arts which was introduced by the Museum in February 1889. Other early collection objects were assigned numbers beginning with 'B' or 'H', which indicated different kinds of objects.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 1889

Acquisition Date

25 March 1889

Cite this Object

Harvard

Murano glass goblet 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 17 October 2021, <https://ma.as/182225>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/182225 |title=Murano glass goblet |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=17 October 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}