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99/4/82 Child's chair cart, 'mail cart', wood/ metal/ rubber, Australia, 1890-1930. Click to enlarge.

Child’s chair cart, ‘mail cart’, wood/ metal/ rubber, Australia, 1890-1930

Made in Australia, Oceania, 1890-1930.

Child’s chair cart, ‘mail cart’, wood/metal/rubber, Australia, 1890-1930.

This cart is comprising a wooden seat and footrest set into a cube shaped frame made of slats of wood bolted together. There are two metal spoked wheels with solid rubber tyres which are now badly perished. There is a metal axle and buggy-style suspension. There is a wood and metal brake mechanism under the seat. A long ‘T’ shaped wooden arm and handle for pulling the cart extends from the footrest.

Summary

Object No.

99/4/82

Object Statement

Child's chair cart, 'mail cart', wood/ metal/ rubber, Australia, 1890-1930

Physical Description

Child's chair cart, 'mail cart', wood/metal/rubber, Australia, 1890-1930.

This cart is comprising a wooden seat and footrest set into a cube shaped frame made of slats of wood bolted together. There are two metal spoked wheels with solid rubber tyres which are now badly perished. There is a metal axle and buggy-style suspension. There is a wood and metal brake mechanism under the seat. A long 'T' shaped wooden arm and handle for pulling the cart extends from the footrest.

Dimensions

Height

420 mm

Width

400 mm

Production

Notes

Mailcarts appeared in the 1870s as both 'play carts' for children's exercise and play, and as functional prams. The name and design derives from the actual postal delivery carts used at the time.

Mailcarts varied in design and manufacture from simple structures constructed from wooden slats to more elaborate wickered and upholstered carriages. Anthony Hordern and Sons advertised a slat style 'children's mail cart' in 1895 as a toy. In 1922 Grace Brothers were still selling a similar cart in their toy department, described as a 'wood chair cart': Jack Hampshire, 'Prams, Mailcarts and Bassinets, Tunbridge Wells, 1980. (see blue file)

Made

1890-1930

Source

Credit Line

Gift of the National Trust of Australia, NSW, 1999

Acquisition Date

12 January 1999

Cite this Object

Harvard

Child's chair cart, 'mail cart', wood/ metal/ rubber, Australia, 1890-1930 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 21 January 2019, <https://ma.as/167250>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/167250 |title=Child's chair cart, 'mail cart', wood/ metal/ rubber, Australia, 1890-1930 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=21 January 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

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