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99/101/1 Scarf (charlottenburger), German carpenter's guild, cotton, Hagama, Germany, 1945. Click to enlarge.

Scarf (charlottenburger), German carpenter’s guild, cotton, Hagama, Germany, 1945

Made by Hagama in Germany, 1945.

Scarf, (charlottenburger), German carpenter’s guild, cotton, Hagama, Germany, 1945.

Large white cotton scarf printed with red and black illustrations and text, featuring a red border with guild insignia at each corner. Insignia of German bricklayers are in the top corners and carpenters’ insignia at the bottom. Next to each of these is a drawing of a carpenter or bricklayer in work attire and formal wear. The latter in both cases feature elaborate suits with flared trousers, walking sticks and ...

Summary

Object No.

99/101/1

Object Statement

Scarf (charlottenburger), German carpenter's guild, cotton, Hagama, Germany, 1945

Physical Description

Scarf, (charlottenburger), German carpenter's guild, cotton, Hagama, Germany, 1945.

Large white cotton scarf printed with red and black illustrations and text, featuring a red border with guild insignia at each corner. Insignia of German bricklayers are in the top corners and carpenters' insignia at the bottom. Next to each of these is a drawing of a carpenter or bricklayer in work attire and formal wear. The latter in both cases feature elaborate suits with flared trousers, walking sticks and hats. Both bricklayers and carpenters in the illustration have earrings. Illustrations of various European cities and towns in which these guilds operated fill the spaces between the figures.

The remainder of the scarf is filled with German text. The most prominent is 'Hagama 1857' at the centre. This refers to the manufacturer of the costumes and scarf and its establishment date. Around this is a series of promotional statements (see marks field for translation). Throughout this text are curving lines of prose which read counter clockwise from top left (see marks for translation).

Marks

All text, printed in black in German, translation follows: Manufacturer of costumes and scarf and its date of establishment, in centre of text on scarf, 'Hagama 1857', surrounding text, a series of promotional statements, from the top, 'When buying take notice of this brand/ Hundred year tradition and Experience/ guaranteed first class quality. Best workmanship/ and faultless fit/ Hagama 1857/ Strong fibre, will not tear, excellent wearing, specially woven/ corduroy [Manchester] Clothing/ from hannover cloth. Guaranteed [Manchester] corduroy/ for Carpenters, Bricklayers, Rooftilers and Masons/distributors."
Throughout this text are curving lines of prose, counter clockwise from top left, 'Wake up tradesman/ Round is the world therefore let us travel/ Wandering is the Miller's joy/ Brother can't you see the sun/ We sat on Monday happy and content/ As I one Saturday from this hostel came/ Wandering wandering we must go/ of all the girls so fine and beautiful for me is only Love.'

Dimensions

Height

763 mm

Width

772 mm

Production

Notes

The scarf was made by German guild clothing manufacturer Hagama. These dates reflect the earliest possible year of Karl Rieck's apprenticeship in Germany and the year he left the Snowy Mountains Scheme.

Made

Hagama Germany 1945

History

Notes

The scarf was used by carpenter Karl Reick to wrap his lunch and tools while working on the Snowy Mountains Hydro-electric Scheme in the early 1950s.

Also known as a charlottenburger, it has an important place in the complex tradition of German guilds. While the carpenters' guild had existed since the 13th century, the codes and symbolism of the costume of which this scarf was a part were probably derived from 19th century developments. Scarves like this were worn by many of the carpenters who worked on the Snowy Mountains Scheme.

Only carpenters, slaters, bricklayers or stonemasons who had served an apprenticeship of 3 years and one day were allowed to join a trade guild. Having done so they were required to travel, or 'journey', beyond a radius of 50 kilometres from their home town to find work, for another period of 3 years and a day. During their journeying, guild members had to wear a trade or guild costume, of the sort depicted on this scarf. In the case of carpenters this was comprising a hat, black corduroy double breasted jacket, corduroy waist coat with eight mother of pearl buttons (representing the winning of the 8 hour day), flared corduroy trousers and a knotted wooden cane. Gold earrings were also worn by some members; these were presented by the guild and, upon the death of the member, were to be melted down and used to pay for the funeral and wake.

The charlottenburger was integral to this outfit. A guild member was only allowed to carry what tools and spare clothes he could fit into his scarf. Some of the images of travelling guild members on this charlottenburger show possessions wrapped in this fashion.

This example of the charlottenburger was given to Karl Rieck when he purchased his guild costume in the late 1940s. It advertises the costume brand name and celebrates the guild traditions catered for by the manufacturer Hagama: slaters, bricklayers, stonemasons and carpenters. Prior to this, non-commercial chalottenburgers were supplied by the guild.

Many of the German carpenters who came to Australia to work on the Snowy Scheme wore these costumes as guild members. Karl Rieck was still in the 3 year post-apprenticeship period and so was required to wear the costume.

Mr Rieck was recruited in Germany by the Snowy Mountains Authority [SMA]. Despite his guild membership he had to pass an SMA carpentry test, by making wood louvres, as part of the recruitment process. Upon arrival in Sydney he underwent another test conducted by the Building Workers Industrial Union [BWIU] at Sydney Technical College. Like most other carpenters, Mr Rieck joined the union which represented all carpenters and bricklayers on the Snowy Scheme. The BWIU was particularly concerned about determining the qualifications of immigrant workers employed by the Scheme. Having done so it was diligent about representing their interests, while remaining critical of the policy of recruiting 'foreign' labour. Included in the blue file is a copy of an article from a 1951 issue of the union paper 'Building Worker' printed in both German and English in which these issues are raised. The bi-lingual article is also a reflection of the relatively high numbers of German immigrants within the building trades.

Carpenter Karl Rieck bought this scarf with a guild costume as an apprentice in Germany in the late 1940s.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Mr Karl Rieck, 1999

Acquisition Date

6 September 1999

Cite this Object

Harvard

Scarf (charlottenburger), German carpenter's guild, cotton, Hagama, Germany, 1945 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 20 September 2019, <https://ma.as/166311>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/166311 |title=Scarf (charlottenburger), German carpenter's guild, cotton, Hagama, Germany, 1945 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=20 September 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

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