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97/249/1 Interactive, noughts and crosses machine, pvc / metal / timber / electronic components, made by the Interactives Department of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1988. Click to enlarge.

Microprocessor based interactive, noughts and crosses machine

Made by Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1988.

The Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences noughts and crosses machines are regarded, by staff and public alike, as among the most popular and notorious interactives installed at the Museum over many years.

Since 1955, the Museum has evolved a number of noughts and crosses machines. These machines developed the game from being two dimensional to three dimensional, and from valve to solid state to microprocessor technology. The 1950s and 1960s machines were orginally displayed in the old Harris St...

Summary

Object No.

97/249/1

Object Statement

Interactive, noughts and crosses machine, pvc / metal / timber / electronic components, made by the Interactives Department of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1988

Physical Description

The microprocessor based interactive noughts and crosses machine consists of the following elements:

The I/O (input/output) board which displays the game is built in a metal and pvc housing set into a laminted timber mount. The face of the mechanism is divided into 9 squares, each with the capacity to display a 'O' or a 'X'. Above this is another display from which running commentaries of the game in progress and cumulative scores may be read. From the rear of this unit ribbon cables and power leads are accessible for connection to a power supply and main circuit boards.

Housing diagrams are printed on A5 transparencies and contained in a paper file taped on two sides. These diagrams were produced by the MAAS interactives department and are diagrams of 1) General Assembly; 2) Cover & Brackets; 3) Sides & Back - Back & Front Plate

The four circuit boards for the mechanism are mounted in an alloy frame that exposes them for scrutiny by the public. This interactive uses microprocessor technology to configure all the possible algorithms and run the game. This part of the mechanism was constructed in this manner so that it could be viewed in comparison to the MAAS valve and solid state noughts and crosses machines.

There is a quantity of A4 photocopies with descriptions of the mechanism, circuit and wiring diagrams.

There are two power supplies that provide current to the circuits and I/O board. One is a 'Statronic Modular Power Supply' model 53/4 which provides an output of 22-26V 2.5A. It has a cable that connects from the face of the power supply to a domestic outlet.

The other power supply is a "Statronic Modular Power Supply' model 53/5 which provides an output of 4-6V 3A. It has a cable that connects from the face of the power supply to a domestic outlet.

There is one small cable that connects a power supply to the circuit boards.

Marks

No marks

Dimensions

Width

180 mm

Production

Notes

Designed and made by the Interactives department of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences.

In 1984 the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences began its commitment to develop a range of science and technology interactive exhibits. These successful exhibits were so popular with visitors that a decision was made to establish an Interactives Department at the Museum.

History

Notes

This noughts and crosses machine was last used in the 'Recollections' exhibition which was dismantled in July of 1997.

Source

Credit Line

Ex Museum Stock, 1997

Acquisition Date

8 September 1997

Cite this Object

Harvard

Microprocessor based interactive, noughts and crosses machine 2019, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 7 December 2019, <https://ma.as/157561>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/157561 |title=Microprocessor based interactive, noughts and crosses machine |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=7 December 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
This object is currently on display at the Powerhouse Museum.

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