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97/2/9 Spacecraft, model, Soyuz-4-5, metal, wood, plastic, Exhibition Centre, USSR/Russian Academy of Sciences, [1957-1984]. Click to enlarge.

Spacecraft, model, Soyuz-4-5, metal, wood, plastic, Exhibition Centre, USSR/Russian Academy of Sciences, [1957-1984]

Made in USSR, pre 1985.

Spacecraft, model, Soyuz-4-5, metal, wood, plastic, Exhibition Centre, USSR/Russian Academy of Sciences, pre-1985. 1:3 scale model of the Soyuz-4-5 crewed spacecraft linkup. The docking of Soyuz-4 and Soyuz-5 on 16 January, 1969, represented the first time that two piloted spacecraft had successfully joined together in space. Each Soyuz spacecraft consists of a spherical ‘orbital module’at the front, a bell-shaped re-entry module in the middle of the craft, with a cylindrical service module at t...

Summary

Object No.

97/2/9

Object Statement

Spacecraft, model, Soyuz-4-5, metal, wood, plastic, Exhibition Centre, USSR/Russian Academy of Sciences, [1957-1984]

Physical Description

Spacecraft, model, Soyuz-4-5, metal, wood, plastic, Exhibition Centre, USSR/Russian Academy of Sciences, pre-1985. 1:3 scale model of the Soyuz-4-5 crewed spacecraft linkup. The docking of Soyuz-4 and Soyuz-5 on 16 January, 1969, represented the first time that two piloted spacecraft had successfully joined together in space. Each Soyuz spacecraft consists of a spherical 'orbital module'at the front, a bell-shaped re-entry module in the middle of the craft, with a cylindrical service module at the rear. Long solar panels extend from either side of the service module. The two craft are joined nose-to-nose by a short, cylindrical docking tunnel, painted grey.

Dimensions

Height

3000 mm

Width

3000 mm

Production

Notes

The original Soyuz spacecraft was designed by engineers working at the Korolyev Design Bureau, under the ultimate control of the Soviet Academy of Sciences. In the Soviet system, the term 'Design Bureau' denoted an academic/technical institute under the leadership of a senior scientist or engineer. There were several 'Design Bureaux' associated with the Soviet space program, each associated with different space projects. The Soyuz spacecraft, first introduced in 1967, remains the basic design for Soviet/Russian crewed spacecraft. It was the last piloted vehicle designed with direct input from Sergei Korolyev, who was a leading figure in the Soviet space program. Soyuz-4 and 5 represent the first generation Soyuz spacecraft: the modified Soyuz-T was introduced in 1979 and the Soyuz-TM, with further modifications was introduced in 1986.

This model was manufactured in the workshops of the Exhibition Centre of the then-Soviet Academy of Sciences. The original spacecraft were manufactured in the workshops of the Korolyev Design Bureau.

No information has ever been provided by the USSR/Russian Academy of Sciences as to the actual construction date of any of the items lent to the museum. The proposed date is a best estimate, based on the evidence of prior display, before the material came to the Powerhouse. The original Soyuz-4 and 5 spacecraft were constructed in 1968.

Made

USSR pre 1985

History

Notes

This model was made by the Soviet Academy of Sciences for use in exhibitions about the Soviet space program, mounted outside the USSR. It is not known what previous exhibitions it may have been used in. The original Soyuz-4 and Soyuz-5 were part of the Soviet lunar program, commenced in 1964 as a response to the US Apollo program. The Soyuz-4-5 docking was intended to practice the rendezvous and docking techniques that would have to be carried out between a Souyz spacecraft and a lunar landing module during a Moon landing mission. The Soyuz-4-5 mission was also deliberately timed to pre-empt the planned Apollo-9 docking demonstration mission, and thus claim the honours for the first docking of two crewed spacecraft. Soyuz-4 was launched on 14 January 1969, with Soyuz 5 launched the following day. The two spacecraft met and docked in orbit on 16 January. During the docking, cosmonauts Yevgeni Khrunov and Alexei Yeliseyev transferred from Soyuz-5, via a spacewalk, to join Vladimir Shatalov in Soyuz-4. This was the first crew transfer between space vehicles and the three cosmonauts returned to Earth in Soyuz-4. Boris Volyonov returned alone in Soyuz-5. Soyuz-4 returned to Earth on 17 January, with Soyuz-5 landing the following day. The Soviet Moon program was abandonned in 1970, after the successful Apollo 11 and 12 lunar landings, without ever achieving a mission to lunar orbit.

The USSR later described the Soyuz-4-5 docking as the first experimental space station, and designated it as a precursor to the Salyut space station program, which commenced in 1971.
Originally owned by the USSR Academy of Sciences. lent to the museum in 1987 as part of L2046. This entire collection was purchased by the museum in 1996.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 1997

Acquisition Date

20 January 1997

Cite this Object

Harvard

Spacecraft, model, Soyuz-4-5, metal, wood, plastic, Exhibition Centre, USSR/Russian Academy of Sciences, [1957-1984] 2019, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 15 October 2019, <https://ma.as/157010>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/157010 |title=Spacecraft, model, Soyuz-4-5, metal, wood, plastic, Exhibition Centre, USSR/Russian Academy of Sciences, [1957-1984] |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=15 October 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
This object is currently on display in Space at the Powerhouse Museum.

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

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