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97/180/2 Didgeridoo (didjeridu), wood / paint, made and decorated by Gerard Yirawala, Maningrida Arts & Culture, Maningrida, Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia, 1997. Click to enlarge.

Didgeridoo (didjeridu), made and decorated by Gerard Yirawala

Artist
Didgeridoo made from length of hollowed timber and painted in red ochre. The length of the didgeridoo features black flowers with long white stems and white feather-like foliage on short black stems. The plant design depicts an edible tuber that related to a song style in the Kunborrk music tradition. The ends of the didgeridoo are painted black with large white seed pods and a decorative ring at the point where the red ochre meets the black paint. The blowing end is coated in 'sugarbag resin'. This is black beeswax which comes from wild bees and has a distinctive aroma.

Summary

Object No.

97/180/2

Object Statement

Didgeridoo (didjeridu), wood / paint, made and decorated by Gerard Yirawala, Maningrida Arts & Culture, Maningrida, Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia, 1997

Physical Description

Didgeridoo made from length of hollowed timber and painted in red ochre. The length of the didgeridoo features black flowers with long white stems and white feather-like foliage on short black stems. The plant design depicts an edible tuber that related to a song style in the Kunborrk music tradition. The ends of the didgeridoo are painted black with large white seed pods and a decorative ring at the point where the red ochre meets the black paint. The blowing end is coated in 'sugarbag resin'. This is black beeswax which comes from wild bees and has a distinctive aroma.

Marks

No marks.

Production

Notes

The didjeridu was designed and made by Gerard Yirawala (Kunwinjku language), Ngangak, Maningrida, Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia in 1997. The didjeridu is new and in playing condition.

History

Notes

The didjeridu is known as a mako in the Kunwinjku language.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 1997

Acquisition Date

27 June 1997

Cite this Object

Harvard

Didgeridoo (didjeridu), made and decorated by Gerard Yirawala 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 26 October 2020, <https://ma.as/156567>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/156567 |title=Didgeridoo (didjeridu), made and decorated by Gerard Yirawala |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=26 October 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.