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96/69/1 Day dress, womens, comprising bodice, skirt, train and collar, silk / metal, by W H McClelland and Company, worn by Lizzie Henrietta Harris, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1883. Click to enlarge.

Day dress worn by Lizzie Henrietta Harris

Made
The day dress consists of a tight-fitting bodice and a boned bustle skirt with a detachable train. The dress is made from green-gold shot silk and patterned with blue sprigs. The bodice is made from plain and patterned fabric with frogged lappets. The front of the bodice has four gold and silver coloured buttons, decorated with a floral motif, which hook together to close. The skirt of the dress has a built-in boned bustle within the patterned fabric and has vertical pleated panels of plain …

Summary

Object No.

96/69/1

Object Statement

Day dress, womens, comprising bodice, skirt, train and collar, silk / metal, by W H McClelland and Company, worn by Lizzie Henrietta Harris, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1883

Physical Description

The day dress consists of a tight-fitting bodice and a boned bustle skirt with a detachable train. The dress is made from green-gold shot silk and patterned with blue sprigs. The bodice is made from plain and patterned fabric with frogged lappets. The front of the bodice has four gold and silver coloured buttons, decorated with a floral motif, which hook together to close. The skirt of the dress has a built-in boned bustle within the patterned fabric and has vertical pleated panels of plain fabric. These panels, the bodice collar and cuffs are trimmed with cream lace. The dress has a detachable train which hooks under the back of the skirt for formal occasions. The dress is labeled 'McClelland and Company, 94 King Street, Sydney' on the waistband.

Marks

No marks

Dimensions

Height

1100 mm

Width

650 mm

Production

Notes

The day dress was made by W H McClelland and Company, a dressmaking establishment which occupied the premises at 94 King Street, Sydney, during the late nineteenth century. The dress was worn by Lady Mayoress Lizzie Henrietta Harris at a ceremony to mark the laying of the Town Hall's foundation stone in 1883. The style of the dress closely follows European fashions. The elaborate construction of the dress demonstrates the development and availability of the sewing machine in the colony. The labelling of clothing with the manufactures name became standard practice in the 1880s and reflects the growing professionalism of the dressmaking industry.

History

Notes

The day dress was worn by Lizzie Henrietta Harris (nee Dingle Page), the wife of John Harris, who was the Mayor of Sydney from 1881-1883 and 1888-1889. She wore the dress at a ceremony to mark the laying of the Centennial Hall's foundation stone in 1883. The Centennial Hall is now known as the Sydney Town Hall. According to contemporary accounts Mrs Harris was a leading figure in Sydney society and held popular monthly receptions at the Town Hall during her husband's term (Town and Country Journal).

John Harris was a descendent of Surgeon John Harris who between 1794 and 1818 acquired most of the Pyrmont Peninsula. Harris Street roughly follows the early foot track through his Ultimo Estate. The Harris descendants maintained a long involvement with the area.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Mrs H E Atkinson, 1996

Acquisition Date

14 February 1996

Cite this Object

Harvard

Day dress worn by Lizzie Henrietta Harris 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 24 October 2021, <https://ma.as/154393>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/154393 |title=Day dress worn by Lizzie Henrietta Harris |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=24 October 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.