‘Nefertem’ statuette

Made in Egypt, 664-525BC.

This figurine of Nefertem is in excellent condition and complements without duplication the other ancient Egyptian bronze and faience statuettes in the collection. Nefertem represents the power of the rising Sun, and wears a lotus on his head as the lotus was a symbol for the sun. Nefertem was associated with other solar deities such as Re. The other representation of Nefertem in the collection is of faience, and is of the head only.

Summary

Object No.

96/47/1

Physical Description

A small bronze statuette of the Egyptian god Nefertum, son of Ptah and Sekhmet. The figure stands in the canonical striding pose of Egyptian sculpture with one foot forward, arms straight by the sides. On his head is a lotus, symbol of the Sun, with two vertical plumes; the back foot is flanged, indicating the former presence of a base - possibly a recumbent lion, on which Nefertum often stands. The facial features and other details are worn away, and there is green accumulation of corrosion in the creases. On the back of the crown is a loop to suspend the statuette and there is a loose metal object inside.

Marks

No marks

Dimensions

Height

147 mm

Width

32 mm

Depth

40 mm

Production

Made

664-525BC

History

Notes

Probably used as an amulet, seen as magical and powerful and which by proximity to a person exerted a beneficial influence. Used for protection against harm in both life and death. Amulets were devised to deal with the difficulties of life, especially for protection against the evil eye, sickness, infertility and the dangers of childbirth, and to guarantee love and the survival of children.

See also Petrie, W. M. F., Amulets, London, 1914; Lurker, M., The Gods and symbols of Ancient Egypt, London, 1980.

Cite this Object

Harvard

'Nefertem' statuette 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 20 July 2018, <https://ma.as/154197>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/154197 |title='Nefertem' statuette |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=20 July 2018 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

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