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96/382/1 Computer musical instrument, Qasar M8, metal/plastic, Tony Furse, Sydney, 1975-1978. Click to enlarge.

Qasar M8 digital synthesizer

Made
Computer musical instrument, Qasar M8, metal/plastic, Tony Furse, Sydney, 1975-1978. Qasar M8 computer musical instrument consisting of central processing unit only. Rectangular black metal casing with components inside. Each end of polished timber. Series of control switches and sockets on one side. Front and back panels can be unscrewed to reveal electronic circuitry.

Summary

Object No.

96/382/1

Object Statement

Computer musical instrument, Qasar M8, metal/plastic, Tony Furse, Sydney, 1975-1978

Physical Description

Computer musical instrument, Qasar M8, metal/plastic, Tony Furse, Sydney, 1975-1978. Qasar M8 computer musical instrument consisting of central processing unit only. Rectangular black metal casing with components inside. Each end of polished timber. Series of control switches and sockets on one side. Front and back panels can be unscrewed to reveal electronic circuitry.

Dimensions

Height

445 mm

Width

1005 mm

Depth

465 mm

Production

Notes

Designed by Tony Furse

Made by Tony Furse and Creative Strategies, Sydney, Australia

History

Notes

Used by Tony Furse, Kim Ryrie and Peter Vogle as prototype to development of Fairlight CMI

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Tony Furse

Acquisition Date

20 November 1996

Cite this Object

Harvard

Qasar M8 digital synthesizer 2022, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 7 February 2023, <https://ma.as/153203>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/153203 |title=Qasar M8 digital synthesizer |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=7 February 2023 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.