Textile length, batik, silk satin, napthol dyes, designed and made by Alison (Windlass) Carroll, Ernabella, South Australia, 1995

Made by Carroll, Alison (Windlass) in Ernabella, South Australia, Australia, 1995.

Textile length, batik, silk satin, napthol dyes, designed and made by Alison (Windlass) Carroll, Ernabella, South Australia, 1995.
Batik on white silk satin, canting batik, grid pattern of large irregular rectangles, each containing an abstract variation of a flower or star-like form, each with further decoration within. Each rectangle divided by a fine dotted line, meeting at intersections in an elaborate ‘flower’-shape. A frond-shaped border pattern along edges. Orange-red, deep-red, purple-br...

Summary

Object No.

95/318/2

Physical Description

Textile length, batik, silk satin, napthol dyes, designed and made by Alison (Windlass) Carroll, Ernabella, South Australia, 1995.
Batik on white silk satin, canting batik, grid pattern of large irregular rectangles, each containing an abstract variation of a flower or star-like form, each with further decoration within. Each rectangle divided by a fine dotted line, meeting at intersections in an elaborate 'flower'-shape. A frond-shaped border pattern along edges. Orange-red, deep-red, purple-brown on white. Signed at selvage 'Alison Carrol'. Ends unfinished. Workshop no: EB3291AC.

Marks

Signed `Alison Carroll'.

Dimensions

Width

1130 mm

Production

Notes

Designed and made by Alison (Windlass) Carroll (born 1958) at Ernabella Arts workshop. Also known by her Pitjantjatjara name of Milyika, currently 'kunmanara' (unable to be used as someone with the same name has recently died). A younger artist, educated in Adelaide. Ernabella was a mission settlement (refer Winifred Hilliard's book, The People In Between), and from the 1940s crafts were taught to provide employment for people who had previously been nomadic. Weaving was one of the first crafts taught and batik was introduced in 1971 when Leo Brereton taught batik there. The abstract designs of the Pitjantjatjara people rarely have explicit meanings although it is thought they do relate to body and ground painting. This batik is unusual in its rectangular divisions, influenced by Alison Carroll's recent and enthusiastic introduction to printmaking processes like etching (Solarplate workshop, Patron Press, Adelaide with Dianne Longley Feb 1995).

Made by Alison Carroll at Ernabella, using napthol azoic dyes. The lines are made using a canting.

Made

Carroll, Alison (Windlass) 1995

Designed

Carroll, Alison (Windlass) null

History

Notes

Selected from a number of batiks and screenprinted textiles offered during a visit to the Powerhouse Museum in October 1995.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 1995

Acquisition Date

4 December 1995

Cite this Object

Harvard

Textile length, batik, silk satin, napthol dyes, designed and made by Alison (Windlass) Carroll, Ernabella, South Australia, 1995 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 15 October 2018, <https://ma.as/147769>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/147769 |title=Textile length, batik, silk satin, napthol dyes, designed and made by Alison (Windlass) Carroll, Ernabella, South Australia, 1995 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=15 October 2018 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

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