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94/207/1 Coat, mens, Driza-Bone, cotton / metal, E Le Roy Pty Ltd, Australia, 1950-1954. Click to enlarge.

Driza-Bone coat made in Australia

Made
The origins of the the Driza-Bone can be traced to last century when a young Scottish migrant, Edward Le Roy, began making wet weather coats for windjammer sailors out of torn cotton sails waterproofed with linseed oil. These sailing ships travelled between Britain, Europe and Australia. Due to their iron hulls the ships travelled low in the water which meant that the sailors spent most of their time wet and required some form of wet weather gear to protect them.

Some of these sailors settled in Australia and Le Roy's coats became very popular with rural workers. In partnership with soap manufacturer T E Pearson, he began manufacturing the coats from a backyard shed in Manly. As the coat became more popular with rural workers its styling grandually changed to meet their needs. It was made longer for horse riding, and a fantail was placed in the centre back so it could comfortably fit over the horse and keep the saddle dry. Wrist straps stopped the arms getting cold and wet, and leg straps stopped the coat from flapping. A new oiling process was developed so that the coat wouldn't go hard and crack in the harsh dry conditions of the Australian bush. These refinements resulted in a range of practical hardwearing garments which have become increasingly identified as part of an Australian national costume.

Summary

Object No.

94/207/1

Object Statement

Coat, mens, Driza-Bone, cotton / metal, E Le Roy Pty Ltd, Australia, 1950-1954

Physical Description

Coat, mens, Driza-Bone, cotton, E Le Roy Pty Ltd, Australia, 1950-1954.

Brown Driza-Bone waterproof riding coat. Loose fitting coat to calf length with a small fold down collar which can be pulled up around neck and fastened with strap and snap closure. Short self fabric cape over shoulders, centre front opening fastening with snap closures and concealed beneath storm flap. Long sleeves with adjustable wrist snaps and elbow patches of same fabric. Two large patch pockets at front hip. Deep centre back vent with fantail gusset, partly lined. Cotton fabric features a waterproof finish. Label inside back neck.

Marks

White fabric label: DRIZA-BONE/REGD/E Le Roy (Aust) Pty Ltd/RIDING SYLE/ALL COTTON SIZE 6. AUSTRALIAN MADE.

Dimensions

Width

630 mm

Production

Notes

The origins of the the Driza-Bone can be traced to last century when a young Scottish emigrant Edward Le Roy began making wet weather coats for windjammer sailors out of torn cotton sails waterproofed with linseed oil. These sailing ships travelled between Britain, Europe and Australia. Due to their iron hulls the ships travelled low in the water which meant that the sailors spent most of their time wet and required some form of wet weather gear to protect them. Some of these sailors settled in Australia and Le Roy's coats became very popular with rural workers. In partnership with a soap manufacturer T E Pearson he began manufacturing the coats from a backyard shed in Manly. As the coat became more popular with rural workers its styling grandually changed to meet their needs. It was made longer for horse riding and a fantail placed in the centre back so it could comfortably fit over the horse and keep the saddle dry. Wrist straps stopped the arms getting cold and wet, and leg straps stopped the coat from flapping. A new oiling process was developed so that the coat wouldn't go hard and crack in the harsh dry conditions of the Australian bush. These refinements resulted in a range of practical hardwearing garments which have become increasingly identified as part of an Australian national costume.

History

Notes

John Joiner was former property manager of 'Muttama' station near Coonamble, NSW. He bought the coat in the early 1950s and wore it all his working life. His work included cattle mustering, and he wore the coat while mustering on horseback and later by motor bike. According to John the coat probably saved his and his son's life when he threw it over the face of a charging bull.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of John Joiner, 1994

Acquisition Date

23 September 1994

Cite this Object

Harvard

Driza-Bone coat made in Australia 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 26 November 2020, <https://ma.as/140106>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/140106 |title=Driza-Bone coat made in Australia |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=26 November 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.