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2824 [WEB APPROVED] Figurine, 'Diana', terracotta, probably modelled by John Broad, Doulton & Co, Lambeth, London, England, c.1880. Click to enlarge.

‘Diana’ figurine by Doulton

Made
Buff coloured, press-moulded terracotta figure of a bare-breasted woman wearing a short tunic tied at the waist, one arm raised reaching for an arrow from the rectangular quiver at her back, standing on a circular plinth.

Summary

Object No.

2824

Object Statement

Figurine, 'Diana', terracotta, probably modelled by John Broad, Doulton & Co, Lambeth, London, England, c.1880

Physical Description

Buff coloured, press-moulded terracotta figure of a bare-breasted woman wearing a short tunic tied at the waist, one arm raised reaching for an arrow from the rectangular quiver at her back, standing on a circular plinth.

Marks

On front of plinth: "DIANA".On base, incised: "2P".

Dimensions

Height

302 mm

Width

97 mm

Depth

73 mm

Production

Notes

Probably modelled by John Broad at Lambeth works, about 1880. Broad worked for Doulton from 1873 to 1919.

Cite this Object

Harvard

'Diana' figurine by Doulton 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 25 September 2020, <https://ma.as/13390>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/13390 |title='Diana' figurine by Doulton |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=25 September 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.