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92/1993 House model, 'The House of Tomorrow', acrylic, house designed by architect Robin Boyd in 1949, model made by R&F Porter Modelmakers Pty Ltd, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1992. Click to enlarge.

Architectural model, House of Tomorrow designed by Robin Boyd, 1949

Designed 1949
Robin Boyd designed the first of a post-war explosion of modernist display homes with his House of Tomorrow. Displayed by the Small Homes Service at the 1949 Modern Home Show at the Exhibition Building in Carlton Gardens, this house made a similar impact in Melbourne to that made by Seidler's Rose Seidler house in Sydney. The Argus observed that the House of Tomorrow was ?the centre of attraction ? no doubt its modernity will inflict a shock on the conservative type of home owner or builder. Perhaps the most striking feature is the all-glass entrance hall'.

The rapidly-assembled house was a display set rather than a completed house; visitors had to view the house through its unglazed windows rather than walk through the interior, which featured furniture and fittings by Grant Featherstone and other contemporary designers. The most striking feature of its design was the cantilevered bedroom space above the kitchen, although from Boyd's summary of responses in his Age column, it is clear that he received many negative reactions to features including the flat roof, open planning (?How do you eradicate cooking smells?') and the colours (purple and blue-green). The practice of highlighting a house's form via contrasting wall colours was clearly confronting for many Melbournites.

Charles Pickett, Curator Design and built environment, 1992

Summary

Object No.

92/1993

Object Statement

House model, 'The House of Tomorrow', acrylic, house designed by architect Robin Boyd in 1949, model made by R&F Porter Modelmakers Pty Ltd, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1992

Physical Description

Acrylic model, painted white, of a T-shaped two-storey house. At the intersection is an entrance gallery roofed in persepex. To one side the living room with its 'window' wall, on the other a two-storey block, the second storey cantilevered. The whole on a flat base painted grey and with a transparent acylic cover. Scale 1:25.

Marks

No marks

Dimensions

Height

550 mm

Width

840 mm

Depth

840 mm

Production

Designed

1949

Made

1992

Notes

The model was made by R & F Modelmakers Pty Ltd in 1992.

History

Notes

The model was commissioned for the Powerhouse Museum exhibition 'The Australian Dream: Design of the fifties', 1992-1993.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 1992

Acquisition Date

29 December 1992

Cite this Object

Harvard

Architectural model, House of Tomorrow designed by Robin Boyd, 1949 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 31 May 2020, <https://ma.as/126242>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/126242 |title=Architectural model, House of Tomorrow designed by Robin Boyd, 1949 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=31 May 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

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