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2003/2/1 Coin, tetradrachm, Kingdom of Alexander III (336-323BC), issued posthumously, in name of Philip III, silver (17.072 grams) from the Persian Treasuries, Babylon Mint (modern Iraq), 323-317 BC. Click to enlarge.

Coin, tetradrachm, Kingdom of Alexander III (336-323BC), issued posthumously, in name of Philip III, silver (17.072 grams) from the Persian Treasuries, Babylon Mint (modern Iraq), 323-317 BC

Made 323-317 BCE

On Alexander the Great’s deathbed at Babylon in 323 BC, he was asked who should inherit his huge empire which stretched from Greece to India. ‘To the strongest’ was the reputed and wholly Alexandrian reply. After decades of struggle and negotiation, power in Asia and Egypt was divided between the three generals who proved to be strongest: Ptolemy, Seleucis and Attalus. Such a huge empire required many mints to process the massive wealth of the two-hundred year old Persian Empire into a more easi...

Summary

Object No.

2003/2/1

Object Statement

Coin, tetradrachm, Kingdom of Alexander III (336-323BC), issued posthumously, in name of Philip III, silver (17.072 grams) from the Persian Treasuries, Babylon Mint (modern Iraq), 323-317 BC

Physical Description

Coin, tetradrachm, Kingdom of Alexander III (336-323BC), issued posthumously, in name of Philip III, silver (17.072 grams) from the Persian Treasuries, Babylon Mint (modern Iraq), 323-317 BC

Tetradrachm, silver (17.072 grams ) struck in relief on both sides,
Obverse: Head of Herakles facing right wearing lion skin and within dotted border around perimeter.
Reverse: Zeus seated on throne facing left with eagle in outstretched hand, to left M, and below throne AY monogram, in exergue BASILE[OS] (king) and vertically to right of throne PHILIPOU (Philip).

Dimensions

Height

3 mm

Production

Notes

The Alexandrian tetradrachm became the widest-used currency of the ancient world. This was the result of the vast wealth taken from the defeated Persian Empire, and the twenty mints established all over the Hellenistic Empire to produce the coins.

Babylon, c323-317 BC. No single general of Alexander could rule alone. To bide their time, the generals placed Philip III (Arrhidaeus) jointly on the throne with Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV but tragic events common to issues of succession in the Macedonian royal household quickly ensued. Philip III was murdered in 317 BC by Olympias (Alexander the Great's mother). This left Alexander IV (Olympias' grandson) as a child king, until 311 BC when Kassander (319-297 - son of Antipater the regent of Macedon appointed by Alexander the Great) had him murdered together with his mother Roxana.

Issued by Phillip III (Arrhidaeus) in the style of Alexander III (the great)

Made

323-317 BCE

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 2003

Acquisition Date

7 January 2003

Cite this Object

Harvard

Coin, tetradrachm, Kingdom of Alexander III (336-323BC), issued posthumously, in name of Philip III, silver (17.072 grams) from the Persian Treasuries, Babylon Mint (modern Iraq), 323-317 BC 2019, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 20 September 2019, <https://ma.as/11932>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/11932 |title=Coin, tetradrachm, Kingdom of Alexander III (336-323BC), issued posthumously, in name of Philip III, silver (17.072 grams) from the Persian Treasuries, Babylon Mint (modern Iraq), 323-317 BC |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=20 September 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

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