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10086 Botanical models (2), Atropa belladonna, Solonaceae (fruit of Deadly Nightshade), mixed media, Dr Auzoux, Paris, France, c 1880. Click to enlarge.

Model of Deadly Nightshade fruit

Made
Two botanical models of fruit of Deadly Nightshade, one with flower closed, one with flower open. Each flower is supported by a long narrow stem on a square wooden base. An old MAAS label accompanies the objects.

(1) A narrow stem rises out of a square base. Bright green 'CALICE MONO SEPALE' supports a purple and yellow flower with accentuated veins. The flower is laabelled 'BELLA DONNE ... [incomplete] ... [incomplete] fleur complet. Another label 'COROLLE mono petal'. The stigmate rises out …

Summary

Object No.

10086

Object Statement

Botanical models (2), Atropa belladonna, Solonaceae (fruit of Deadly Nightshade), mixed media, Dr Auzoux, Paris, France, c 1880

Physical Description

Two botanical models of fruit of Deadly Nightshade, one with flower closed, one with flower open. Each flower is supported by a long narrow stem on a square wooden base. An old MAAS label accompanies the objects.

(1) A narrow stem rises out of a square base. Bright green 'CALICE MONO SEPALE' supports a purple and yellow flower with accentuated veins. The flower is laabelled 'BELLA DONNE ... [incomplete] ... [incomplete] fleur complet. Another label 'COROLLE mono petal'. The stigmate rises out of the centre and is surrounded by yellow 'ETAMINES PERYGINES.' The calyx is hinged to allow opening of a petal to reveal the interior.
(2) Five large petals surround the dark purple fruit of the 'Bella Donna'. The fruit is hinged to allow it to open to show 'placenta' and seeds . Labels 'Placenta' and 'Pulpe' are attached. Another label of a small hand points to the hinge.

Production

Made

Notes

Louis Thomas Jerome Auzoux (1797-1878) began making anatomical models from papier mache in 1826 when, training to be a doctor, he became aware of the difficulty of teaching anatomy using human cadavers. Models in wax were available but were very expensive. In contrast, papier mache was comparatively inexpensive, stable and able to be easily moulded. Furthermore, it was strong enough to allow each model to be taken apart to show the arrangement of organs, 's'enlever une a une comme une veritable dissection'. By 1833 Auzoux had established a factory in the village of Saint-Aubin d'Ecrossville that manufactured a range of anatomical, zoological and botanical models for sale to medical schools, colleges and museums. Over the next century and a half the range increased to some 600 models, the majority zoological and botanical with 100 relating to human anatomy. For many years the Auzoux family had a shop in the Rue du medecine in Paris. the shop finally cloased in the 1990s and the contents were sold at auction on 22 October 1998.

History

Notes

This model was purchased from Dr Auzoux's workshop in 1885 as part of a larger collection of 'models in papier mache of ... familiar plants'. The year before museum had purchased models of silk worm moths, berries and 'ten models illustrating the natural order of plants'. All of these models were articulated so as to be able to be taken apart to demonstrate the 'internal economy' of the plant or flower. A newspaper account survives of one of these models -- the silkworm -- being demonstrated to the Royal Society by the Museum's curator and in the original aims for the museum regular Wednesday afternoon demonstrations by the curator were a key feature. However, overcrowding at the Agricultural Hall was blamed for their cessation and the 1893 building did not make any special provision for demonstrations by providing, for example, a teaching or demonstration room.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 1885

Acquisition Date

8 October 1885

Cite this Object

Harvard

Model of Deadly Nightshade fruit 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 20 January 2022, <https://ma.as/112>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/112 |title=Model of Deadly Nightshade fruit |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=20 January 2022 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.