The Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences acknowledges Australia’s First Nations Peoples as the Traditional Owners and Custodians of the land and gives respect to the Elders – past and present – and through them to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are advised that the MAAS website contains a range of Indigenous Cultural Material. This includes artworks, artifacts, images and recordings of people who may have passed away, and other objects which may be culturally sensitive.
2002/123/1 Reel-to-reel tape recorder, BTR1, metal / plastic / glass / electronic components, designed and manufactured by EMI (Electric and Musical Industries), England, 1948. Click to enlarge.

EMI reel-to-reel tape recorder

Made in England, United Kingdom, Europe, 1948.

The Electric and Musical Industries (EMI) BTR1 (British Tape Recorder version 1) was the first magnetic tape recording machine designed and manufactured in Britain. It was modelled on the German Magnetophone, examples of which were captured by US troops from the German army toward the end of World War 2. These Magnetophones were taken to the USA, where their design was studied and copied by the Ampex Corporation. The technology was shared with allies including the UK.

The development of tape re...

Summary

Object No.

2002/123/1

Object Statement

Reel-to-reel tape recorder, BTR1, metal / plastic / glass / electronic components, designed and manufactured by EMI (Electric and Musical Industries), England, 1948

Physical Description

Reel-to-reel tape recorder, BTR1, metal / plastic / glass / electronic components, designed and manufactured by EMI (Electric and Musical Industries), England, 1948

Professional type tape recorder for use in broadcasting, recording and research. The equipment is housed in a studio console cabinet. The tape deck is on top with the control panel facing the front above access doors.

Production

Notes

The EMI BTR1 design is based upon the German Magnetophone. The Magnetophone hardware was designed by AEG and the tape by the chemical company IG Farben. It was in use by German radio and military forces by 1936.

Magnetic recording existed prior to the tape machine in the form of metal wire recorders, whihc were originally designed and built around 1900 by Danish inventor Valdemar Poulson, who was then working for the Copenhagen Telephone Company.

Manufactured by EMI in the UK.

Made

1948

History

Notes

Around 1995 this EMI BTR/1 was delivered to the EMI music premises in Sydney where it was declined. Steve Crane accepted it from an unknown source and kept it until he offered it to Anthony Russo of the Technical Audio Group. It remained at the donor's premises until it was given to the Museum.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Technical Audio Group, 2002

Acquisition Date

25 September 2002

Cite this Object

Harvard

EMI reel-to-reel tape recorder 2014, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 21 January 2019, <https://ma.as/11152>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/11152 |title=EMI reel-to-reel tape recorder |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=21 January 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

Know more about this object?

TELL US

Have a question about this object?

ASK US