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2001/9/1 Vase, 'Jack in the pulpit', favrile glass, designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany, c. 1900, made by Tiffany Furnaces, Corona, Long Island, New York, United States of America, 1908. Click to enlarge.

'Jack in the pulpit' vase by Tiffany

Designed
This 'Jack in the pulpit' vase was designed in around 1900 by Louis Comfort Tiffany possibly in collaboration with Thomas Manderson, Tiffany's first glass blower. One of the largest and most spectacular versions in 'Jack in the pulpit' the series, this example was made in 1908 at Tiffany Furnaces in Corona, Long Island, New York. 'Jack in the pulpit' vases (named after an American wildflower) with their slender, curving stems and large undulating corollas are among the best known examples of …

Summary

Object No.

2001/9/1

Object Statement

Vase, 'Jack in the pulpit', favrile glass, designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany, c. 1900, made by Tiffany Furnaces, Corona, Long Island, New York, United States of America, 1908

Physical Description

Vase, 'Jack in the pulpit', favrile glass, Art Nouveau style, designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany, c. 1900, made by Tiffany Furnaces, Corona, Long Island, New York, USA, 1908

A large vase blown and tooled in golden favrile glass with pink, purple and tourquise highlights. The vase is in the form of a stylised open flower, the tall stem rising from a flattened globular base to support a large undulating corolla with the front part pulled down towards the stem and the back raised upward. Makers mark on base, '7221 C L.C. Tiffany Favrile'.

Marks

Makers mark on base, '7221 C L.C. Tiffany. Favrile'

Dimensions

Height

500 mm

Width

265 mm

Production

Notes

Designed by L.C. Tiffany, New York, most likely with Thomas Menderson, Tiffany's first glass blower, between 1894 and 1900. Vases in the Jack-in-the pulpit shapes were not unique to Tiffany and smaller vases inspired by this woodland flower were already made in England from about 1854 by Stevens & Williams in England and later also by other glass makers.
Possibly crafted by Thomas Menderson and his glass blowing team at Corona.
Made at Tiffany glassworks at Corona, Long Island, New York, c1908. Tiffany & Co glassworks were called Tiffany Furnaces from c1902.

The term 'favrile, Tiffany's trade name for irredescent wares, derived from 'fabrile', an 'old English' (17th century) word meaning handmade or belonging to a craftsman. The first labels (early pieces were unsigned but had paper labels) referred to this type of glass as 'fabrile' but Tiffany soon changed it to 'favrile'. This was registered at the U.S. Patent Office in November 1894 (ref. V. Arwas, 'Glass, Art Nouveau to Art Deco', Rizzoli, 1980, p. 220).

History

Notes

This vase belonged to Minna Rosenblatt's collection, New York.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased with the assistance of the Australian Decorative and Fine Arts Society, Ku-ring-gai Inc, 2000

Acquisition Date

12 February 2001

Cite this Object

Harvard

'Jack in the pulpit' vase by Tiffany 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 7 December 2021, <https://ma.as/10950>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/10950 |title='Jack in the pulpit' vase by Tiffany |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=7 December 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}