The Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences acknowledges Australia’s First Nations Peoples as the Traditional Owners and Custodians of the land and gives respect to the Elders – past and present – and through them to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are advised that the MAAS website contains a range of Indigenous Cultural Material. This includes artworks, artifacts, images and recordings of people who may have passed away, and other objects which may be culturally sensitive.
2001/79/1 Scarf, 'Origami pleat', polyester, designed by Reiko Sudo, pleating technique by Mizue Okada, made by Nuno Corporation, Tokyo (and Takekura Co Ltd, Gumma) Japan, 1997-1999. Click to enlarge.

Scarf, ‘Origami pleat’, polyester, designed by Reiko Sudo, pleating technique by Mizue Okada, made by Nuno Corporation, Tokyo (and Takekura Co Ltd, Gumma) Japan, 1997-1999

Made by Nuno Corporation in Japan, 1997-1999.

The ‘Origami pleat scarf’, designed in 1997 and purchased by the donor in 1999, is an excellent example of the innovative and experimental approach to textile design and production evident in contemporary Japan. The scarf was designed by Reiko Sudo (b. 1953) and manufactured by the Nuno Corporation, Tokyo (est. 1984), using a technique developed by Mizue Okada (b. 1974). Nuno textiles are devised using a combination of traditional techniques, materials and aesthetics with pioneering work using s...

Summary

Object No.

2001/79/1

Object Statement

Scarf, 'Origami pleat', polyester, designed by Reiko Sudo, pleating technique by Mizue Okada, made by Nuno Corporation, Tokyo (and Takekura Co Ltd, Gumma) Japan, 1997-1999

Physical Description

The scarf is made from green, maroon and dark blue pleated and printed polyester organza. The transparent scarf, which is pleated in an origami style, expands to a raised and fluid rectangular shape but springs back to its original long, narrow, angular, folded shape with zigzag edges when released. The scarf edges are machine hemmed.

Marks

Light brown fabric label: '(Nuno symbol in Japanese)'. Light brown cardboard swing tag: '(Nuno symbol in Japanese)' - reverse: 'No S-475/Contents [Japanese characters] 100%/Made in Japan/washing instructions/This fabric was woven using technology/developed and produced by NUNO Corporation'.

Dimensions

Width

75 mm

Production

Notes

Designed by Reiko Sudo (born 1953, Ibaragi, Japan), using a pleating technique developed by Mizue Okada (born 1974). Sudo is the manager and one of the founders of the Nuno Corporation, a design company established in 1984 to produce innovative fabrics. Nuno textiles are devised using a combination of traditional techniques, materials and aesthetics with pioneering work using synthetics, computers, technological advances and experimentation.


Designed by Reiko Sudo using a pleating technique developed by Mizue Okada. In order to create the shape-retaining folded cloth, the polyester fabric was placed between geometric origami-style moulds and vacuum set in a high temperature press. After being opened out, the cloth springs back to its original folded shape. Hand pleated by Hioraki Takehura and Hiroko Suwa. The colour gradation of the piece is the result of interleaving coloured dye transfer paper between the cloth and the outer paper during the heat-transfer process.

This scarf was made 1997-1999.

Made

Nuno Corporation Japan 1997-1999

History

Notes

Purchased in Tokyo in 1999

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Sherman Galleries, 2001

Acquisition Date

31 August 2001

Cite this Object

Harvard

Scarf, 'Origami pleat', polyester, designed by Reiko Sudo, pleating technique by Mizue Okada, made by Nuno Corporation, Tokyo (and Takekura Co Ltd, Gumma) Japan, 1997-1999 2019, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 23 September 2019, <https://ma.as/10727>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/10727 |title=Scarf, 'Origami pleat', polyester, designed by Reiko Sudo, pleating technique by Mizue Okada, made by Nuno Corporation, Tokyo (and Takekura Co Ltd, Gumma) Japan, 1997-1999 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=23 September 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Know more about this object?

TELL US

Have a question about this object?

ASK US